Yo-Yo-Yoga!

So, on Monday afternoon, I started taking hot yoga classes at Sunstone Yoga in North Dallas again after a (very) long hiatus. I’ve committed myself to the Sunstone 60-day challenge, which is to attend 45 classes in 60 days. That’s 5 days a week for 9 weeks. Today was day 3.

As a curvy girl, some of the poses are difficult, but I’ve found several ways to modify the pose to benefit me without hurting, thanks to www.curvyyoga.com

Moves like Tibetan Table, Eagle, and even Child’s Pose are possible for us curvy girls!

As of day three, I feel good! Pooped, but good. ;)

Teacher Wear to Work

Teacher Wear to Work

I <3 my TOMS

I &lt;3 my TOMS

Purple sweater dress
shopping.yahoo.com

Oasis open front cardigan
$65 - oasis-stores.com

Beaded top
$49 - stylistpick.com

Old Navy ripped jeans
oldnavy.gap.com

Toms flat
toms.com

Toms flat
toms.com

Hipanema beading jewelry
$64 - asos.com

Pilgrim heart pendant necklace
$35 - debenhams.com

Snow days

Snow days

Data Obsession

In the 2011-12 school year, my school district was ranked #7 in the biggest 200 Texas Public School Districts, according to the Texas Education Agency’s Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS). If we had graduated 16 more students that year, we would have earned the #3 spot.

Take a moment to absorb that.

In our pre-school staff convocation, the information above was the main topic of discourse… obviously.  Because numbers never lie.

A few minutes ago, I got off the phone with another teacher in my district.  He informed me that this would be his last year teaching, and when I asked him why, he responded, “There is no success.”  He told me that, if you look at the numbers, he isn’t a very good teacher.

You see, a few years ago, he was certified as an AP English teacher.  His students did so well that year on their AP exam that in subsequent years, more and more students were added to his AP classes.  He told me that many of them don’t want to be in AP English.  That many of them don’t want to read books.  And if you know anything about AP English classes, you know how much more difficult they are when you hate to read.

Now comes the inevitable question: Why are those kids taking AP classes if they don’t want to do the work?

Well.  Let me tell you why.

Because it looks really good on paper.  “Oh! Forty percent of your students are taking AP classes?! That’s amazing!  How dedicated they must be!”  Not.

So, when he told me that he doesn’t think that he’s a good teacher, I disagreed with him.  I told him that the things that really matter can’t be counted.  The response I got was that as soon as I become an administrator, my views on that would change – I’d be brainwashed, just like the rest of them.

So, tell me… are data-driven administrators killing schools?

Khan Academy in the Classroom

So, I teach math…  Granted, I teach fundamentals of math classes for Special Education students, so when I say I “teach” math, I basically skim the surface of the major mathematical concepts and hope that nobody asks me too many in-depth questions.  Like “Why?”  I hate “Why?”s… they make my brain shrug.

Honestly, I’m not so modest that the above paragraph should not be taken at face value.  I made straight C’s in math in high school.  Except for Algebra II.  That one was a D… possibly a D-minus.  I think I only “passed” because my dad knew the teacher – two grumpy old men determined that I shouldn’t not graduate because I couldn’t solve advanced Algebraic equations.  Thank goodness.  Besides, I was going to major in English, so who cares about a D in my senior year math class?

If I could go back and smack my 17-year-old self upside the head… I probably wouldn’t.

When I was hired for my current position four years ago and found out that I would be teaching both math and English for 6th-12th grade Special Education students… I almost said “Yeah… no!?”

But three months into the job, I was thrilled that I hadn’t.  Not just because I love my delinquents, but because I was finally learning math.

In the education field, studies show that in order to truly learn a subject, you must be able to teach it, too.  Man, I could write a book on how true that statement is… The first few weeks, I was teaching 6th-, 7th-, 8th grade math, Algebra I, Geometry, and Mathematical Models (which was, at the time, a course designed to prepare students for the 11th grade math state test to determine whether they could graduate or not).  Oh, yeah… I was ALSO teaching English and reading at every secondary level, a couple of science classes, and world geography.

God, that paragraph sounds complain-y.

Was it difficult?  Yes.  Was it stressful?  You have no idea.

But it was worth it.

Every frantic minute taught me a lesson.  Every exhausted afternoon that left me nodding off on the couch before dark was a day that I made an impact.  Every “ummm… I have no idea what the answer to this word problem is…” made me a stronger teacher.

Okay, now ask me how I finally figured out not only how to do math, but how to teach it, too… C’mon, you know you want to know.

Two words:  the Internet.

So, a couple of years later, when I found out about Khan Academy, my first thought was “WHERE WERE YOU TWO YEARS AGO, SAL?!”  And my second thought was, “WHERE WERE YOU WHEN I WAS IN HIGH SCHOOL, SAL?!”

Screen shot 2013-10-18 at 5.22.51 PM

And, you know, there are a lot of people in the education world who criticize Sal Khan and his online school.  I get it.  He’s not a teacher by education or training.  And he’s not always using the correct pedagogical explanations for his lessons.  But.

BUT…

Imagine a world in which everybody (everybody!) with internet access can learn whatever they want to learn.

Earlier today, I ran across a post on Facebook:

Screen shot 2013-10-18 at 4.56.19 PMFirst thought: “Jesus. That’s beautiful.  Khan Academy to Columbia… That’s the fucking American Dream, no?”

Second thought: “Maybe I want to work for Sal…”

Third thought: “Nahhhh…. I love my delinquents too much to leave.”

Okay, so regardless of my train of thought, I did a little Googling, and ran across a WaPo guest post criticizing Khan Academy…. not for what it is, but for how it’s done.

“We face very real challenges in K-12 education today, and they will not be solved with just a Wacom tablet and a YouTube account. Instead, they’ll be solved by teachers who understand their content; who understand how children learn; who walk into the classroom every day and think, ‘I know exactly what I’m going to say, because that’s what teaching means.’ -Karim Kai Ani, Washington Post guest blogger

And, in a lot of ways, I agree.  As Master in Education, I want the pedagogy to be correct… I want Sal to be a great teacher with the education and credibility to back up the hyperbolic pseudonyms the media is giving him.  But I want to believe that we can provide a free and equal education for the whole world. At least it’s a jumping-off point.

The argument can be made (and has been, on my Facebook page) that it’s not meant to be used as a sole source of education.  And I agree, it’s not meant to be used that way.  But it is being used that way, regardless of intentions.  Public school districts (mine included) are using Khan Academy’s video and lesson system to “supplement” classroom mathematics instruction.

My point isn’t that Khan Academy’s not good, but that if schools are going to try to use it to replace direct teaching (which they are currently doing in my district and several others nearby), to free up classroom time for other things (like investigation and experimentation), then it needs to be BETTER than it is currently.

Part of the problem is that a teacher with 100+ students and only one prep period will find that it’s so easy to fall into a pattern of using something like Khan Academy to teach for him/her. (It happens all the time already.)  There have got to be checks and balances in place to ensure that it’s used properly in classrooms before we start using it there. It’s free, and in the education world right now, that’s all that matters.

If it’s used as it’s intended to be used – as a resource for tutorials and practice – then there are magnificent possibilities in the time it can open for teachers and students in the classroom.  But if the instructional pedagogy isn’t embedded in the lessons, then it’s not enough to replace direct instruction.

There is a real opportunity here for world-wide collaboration and discussion.  If Khan Academy can be held to the standards of research-based practices and pedagogy that most universities are, there is no reason that it can’t one day evolve into an educational reform platform that changes the way we “do” education around the world.

But it has to be done correctly.  Methodically.  And without government interference.

And unfortunately, Sal, you’re not quite there yet.  Close, but no cigar.

So, I won’t be using it in my classroom as direct instruction.  As a resource? Sure.  As extra practice? Of course.  As a refresher? You bet.

For now, though, that’s all it will be inside my cinder block walls.

Teaching technology

I know, it’s been a while…

So, I’m taking my first principal certification class, and here’s the assignment for this week:

For this week’s discussion forum,interview a technology leader in your school or district. Use the following questions as your guide for the interview:

  1. What is the school vision for technology?
  2. If technology were removed, what learning would be impossible/impaired?
  3. How do you support professional development?
  4. What is the best “advice” you can give to yourself for moving technology/learning forward in a way that will make more progress for all students?

Hmm…. Here are my thoughts:

Is it just me, or does anyone else feel like this topic is a bit outdated?  I know very, very few classroom teachers (let alone administrators) who DON’T feel like technology is important and encourage its use in the classroom… I’m 30 and grew up using computers.  I think instead of focusing on the USE of technology in the classroom, it’s more important that we teach our students media literacy – how to decipher good vs. bad internet content, and quality vs. quantity.  While my district has tons of technology PD’s geared toward how to use software in the classroom, we have very little for media literacy in the classroom.  My district’s technology vision only deals with use of technology to enhance learning, but doesn’t define the quality of that learning.  Word clouds and videos are fun to make, and I’m sure they might help motivate some students, but in a world where just about everyone has a smartphone, I’m more concerned with teaching them critical thinking regarding web 2.0 tools and how to use them effectively to represent what they’ve learned.  Why spend a class period teaching them to create a website? They can most likely figure it out faster than you can teach them.  They need to know how to find good information to put on the website, copyright law, and writing structure in the classroom.  Let them make the website on their own time.  Maybe it’s just me…

clevaaaah